A little byrd told me...

Reporter, writer, dreamer, lover, human-being.

Showing 20 posts tagged journalism

Satisfaction

Writing an article on a wonkish topic, and wrestling the content to the ground.

futurejournalismproject:

The Gender Gap in Election 2012 Media Sourcing
A new infographic by the 4th Estate illustrates how significantly underrepresented women are in 2012 election coverage. 
via 4thestate:

In our analysis of news stories and transcripts from the past 6 months, men are much more likely to be quoted on their subjective insight in newspapers and on television. This pattern holds true across all major news outlets, as well as on issues specifically concerning women. For example, in front page articles about the 2012 election that mention abortion or birth control, men are 4 to 7 times more likely to be cited than women. This gender gap undermines the media’s credibility.

How they did it:

The 4th Estate collects data from a sampling of news stories from US national print outlets, TV broadcast and radio transcripts covering the 2012 election. These stories are contextually analyzed and broken down by topic, sentiment and newsmaker. The data for this graphic includes quotes and statements from newsmakers who provide subjective insight. Statements from candidates are not counted. The 4th Estate’s sister company, Global News Intelligence, provides similar proprietary services for government and Fortune 500 companies.

futurejournalismproject:

The Gender Gap in Election 2012 Media Sourcing

A new infographic by the 4th Estate illustrates how significantly underrepresented women are in 2012 election coverage. 

via 4thestate:

In our analysis of news stories and transcripts from the past 6 months, men are much more likely to be quoted on their subjective insight in newspapers and on television. This pattern holds true across all major news outlets, as well as on issues specifically concerning women. For example, in front page articles about the 2012 election that mention abortion or birth control, men are 4 to 7 times more likely to be cited than women. This gender gap undermines the media’s credibility.

How they did it:

The 4th Estate collects data from a sampling of news stories from US national print outlets, TV broadcast and radio transcripts covering the 2012 election. These stories are contextually analyzed and broken down by topic, sentiment and newsmaker. The data for this graphic includes quotes and statements from newsmakers who provide subjective insight. Statements from candidates are not counted. The 4th Estate’s sister company, Global News Intelligence, provides similar proprietary services for government and Fortune 500 companies.

(via journo-geekery)

The contstant interview: The lead

constantinterview:

“Journalism is a kind of profession, or craft, or racket, for people who never wanted to grow up and go out into the real world.” —Harry Reasoner

Every journalist knows that the beginning can make or break an article. After all, there’s a reason it is called a “lead” because it must lead the reader to continue. Ideally, a strong lead makes a reader crave to the point that they devour an entire article and tell their friends, their community and their government about what they’ve just read.

For me, my lead remains unwritten. You could say I’m still in the process of figuring out where to begin, and that my story keeps taking different turns. There’s more investigating to be done and I’m not exactly sure where it will end, which as many editors know, means that I don’t really know where to begin.

I’ve got a new blog where I’ll be posting updates about my life as a young reporter. If you’d rather read blogs on WordPress, it has a home there as well. Do tell your friends, won’t you? 

(Source: )

#8833

ohnewsroom:

Reporter on the phone answering a question on how long an interview will take: “It depends on how much you talk.”

"Ben Parr is a technology journalist, web entrepreneur and aspiring world changer. He is best-known as the former editor-at-large of Mashable where he focused on technology trends, the companies behind them, and the intersection of technology, media and society. Ben’s 3+ year career with Mashable began when he joined as a writer in August 2008. Ben is currently working on a yet-to-be-announced project."

The bio of Mashable editor-at-large Ben Parr, who All Things Digital confirmed this evening is leaving the site. He’s one of the site’s most-well-known personalities, so this is big in the blogging world. No comment from Mashable itself on the news. (via shortformblog)

(via shortformblog)

Reporters: Need a good read? Take note

medilldc:

Need a good book? Columbia Journalism Review asked journalists, scholars, and critics to recommend titles for “the next generation of reporters.” Here’s the edited list.

These are about to be added to my Christmas list.

"The days of Excel spreadsheets and HTML tables are gone. Whether we’re watching on TV, reading online, or in a newspaper we expect beautiful and easy to understand representations of important information, no matter how large the underlying data is. DocumentCloud, Information is Beautiful, Piwik, Mining of Massive Datasets, PACER, Google Refine, Google Fusion Tables, Google Public Data Explorer, IBM’s Many Eyes, and ScraperWiki are just some of the data driven journalism tools widely used by mainstream media today."

New Tools for Today’s Investigative Journalist,”  Dan Meredith

(via lifeandcode)

(via futurejournalismproject)

newsweek:

How could we not open this letter to the editor?! The first paragraph, taken by itself (and typed out on a typewriter nonetheless), is quite the gem:

Dear Sir,
Before I start this letter to you I just want to say that I don’t have a way to tweet, Dot Com, or e-mailed. Everyone worries about the US Postal service, all they have to do is write a letter and put a .44 cent stamp on it and it’ll get to your mailbox. And you know, it’s kind of nice to go every day to that box and find a letter in it from a friend or a magazine from Newsweek or US World or Time. 
Anyway, I hope you will see fit to read it but I doubt that you will.

Not only did we read your letter, kind sir, but in a few days you’ll have one of your own in your mailbox, sent from your friends at Newsweek. We agree. It is kinda nice to to get mail.

Old school wins. I love that someone actually sent a physical letter to the editor. Getting mail is a real treat these days when we are all so connected online.

newsweek:

How could we not open this letter to the editor?! The first paragraph, taken by itself (and typed out on a typewriter nonetheless), is quite the gem:

Dear Sir,

Before I start this letter to you I just want to say that I don’t have a way to tweet, Dot Com, or e-mailed. Everyone worries about the US Postal service, all they have to do is write a letter and put a .44 cent stamp on it and it’ll get to your mailbox. And you know, it’s kind of nice to go every day to that box and find a letter in it from a friend or a magazine from Newsweek or US World or Time

Anyway, I hope you will see fit to read it but I doubt that you will.

Not only did we read your letter, kind sir, but in a few days you’ll have one of your own in your mailbox, sent from your friends at Newsweek. We agree. It is kinda nice to to get mail.

Old school wins. I love that someone actually sent a physical letter to the editor. Getting mail is a real treat these days when we are all so connected online.

  1. Camera: iPhone 4
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/15th
  4. Focal Length: 3mm
newsweek:

wearejournalists:

I know the difference between “your” and “you’re,” and I spawn one gray hair every time I witness the two being misused. I feel like I’m sinning if I don’t read at least 3/4 of the newspaper, and I often find myself reading yesterday’s news to cure my guilt. I have feelings of anxiety when I’m sitting still, because I’m worried I may be missing an opportunity. I can fit everything I own into my two-door Honda Civic. I eat a lot of peanut butter and jelly. There are days of despair when my dreams are light years away, and then others when I am so sure of my destiny that it feels as though I’m walking on a cumulonimbus. I’m a 25-year-old college graduate who despises career lectures and any mention of the words “real job.” I’ve (almost) accepted that the path I’ve chosen will take time and will not result in any sort of great wealth. I hope my friends get rich, because I never will be. Those close to me worry about my fate a great deal more than I do. More often than not, I am certain that the only people reading what I write are my parents and my younger sister. I make them proud, and that is enough for me. I don’t have a salary, benefits, or a 401K. I don’t even have an office, an engraved nameplate, or a reserved parking space. I’m wealthy when I have more than three digits in my bank account. I work two jobs, and I don’t even get paid for one of them. I’m new to all of this.I am an editorial intern.

Stay strong, brother! Good things will come.

Love the idea of this Tumblr blog all the way. We are journalists and we need to be reminded that we aren’t alone out there when things get tough because, at the end of the day, we love what we do.

newsweek:

wearejournalists:

I know the difference between “your” and “you’re,” and I spawn one gray hair every time I witness the two being misused. I feel like I’m sinning if I don’t read at least 3/4 of the newspaper, and I often find myself reading yesterday’s news to cure my guilt. I have feelings of anxiety when I’m sitting still, because I’m worried I may be missing an opportunity. I can fit everything I own into my two-door Honda Civic. I eat a lot of peanut butter and jelly. There are days of despair when my dreams are light years away, and then others when I am so sure of my destiny that it feels as though I’m walking on a cumulonimbus. I’m a 25-year-old college graduate who despises career lectures and any mention of the words “real job.” I’ve (almost) accepted that the path I’ve chosen will take time and will not result in any sort of great wealth. I hope my friends get rich, because I never will be. Those close to me worry about my fate a great deal more than I do. More often than not, I am certain that the only people reading what I write are my parents and my younger sister. I make them proud, and that is enough for me. I don’t have a salary, benefits, or a 401K. I don’t even have an office, an engraved nameplate, or a reserved parking space. I’m wealthy when I have more than three digits in my bank account. I work two jobs, and I don’t even get paid for one of them. I’m new to all of this.

I am an editorial intern.

Stay strong, brother! Good things will come.

Love the idea of this Tumblr blog all the way. We are journalists and we need to be reminded that we aren’t alone out there when things get tough because, at the end of the day, we love what we do.

New blog launch

I’ve finally done it. I’ve launched the social media/journalism/media criticism blog that I’ve been thinking about for quite some time. If you’re into this discussion and the changing media-scape, head on over to my new blog and project: Social Meets Media

In my first post, I explain why I started the project in the first place. Here’s an excerpt:

By using social media, newspapers are really getting the opportunity to connect. Reporters gain credibility and followers on Twitter when they use the tool effectively. Word of mouth is often referred to as the best form of advertising, but now word of mouth can happen on various digital platforms.

These conversations can lead to more stories, a stronger connection with readers, and an opportunity for print journalism to evolve and grow. These conversations could even save the industry and result in a new, tech savvy and engaged generation of journalism.

So, why do I care?

Journalism is my passion. I’m currently studying mass communication in college and before I know it, I’ll be a graduate in December. Since the time I entered college in 2008, my job description and expectations as a reporter have changed. I’m adapting to a curriculum that’s writing itself in real-time, in 140 character limits. There’s no textbook for this, just passion and curiosity in how things are changing.

Tell your friends, especially the journalism, news-crazed, media obsessed ones.